AEJMC 2010 Logo Design Competition

Creative Projects Call For Entries

If you’re an educator involved in creative work that isn’t traditional research, consider the VisCom Division’s “Creative Projects” competition. It’s an excellent opportunity to have your efforts recognized by peers in a juried forum. You would present the work at the national AEJMC convention in Denver Aug. 4-7, 2010.

What gets submitted and accepted? The format is non-restrictive, but an entry must include a strong visual component.

Accepted projects in the past have included historical studies, photojournalism exhibits of original work, book proposals or published work, explanations of summer grants or activities, creative DVDs, commentaries on teaching effectiveness, and examples of innovative student projects and accomplishments.

Your submission should include a one-to-two page explanation of the work, stressing its significance to the study of visual journalism.

Did you receive outside support? Does the project examine cutting-edge technology that will enhance your teaching abilities? How does this project fit in with your own interests and goals as a visual educator?

Normally there are about 15 submissions and five are selected for 15-minute presentations. Internet access is not guaranteed, therefore you must show your work via a CD, laptop, thumb drive, etc. A computer projector will be provided on-site. To submit your project, package four copies of it into four individual 9”x12” envelopes. Large and unusually shaped packages present handling issues. For example, instead of submitting an elaborate 11”x14” leather-bound portfolio of archival photographs, send 8.5”x11” inkjet or laser prints stapled together.

Instead of tubes with large rolled posters announcing your film course’s festival, send 8.5”x11” versions. Also, if submitting CDs, use cross-platform common programs. In one larger package, send your four envelopes (three copies without any identification) to the creative projects chair (see box for mailing instructions).

On the cover sheet of the fourth copy, include your name, title, complete contact information (email, phone numbers) and a 75-word abstract summarizing the project.

Michael Cheers, the contest coordinator, will retain this copy. Submitted material will not be returned. Please note: You cannot enter creative projects in any other convention category, including “Best of the Web” Michael Cheers is the Creative Projects chair and an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at San Jose State University. mcheers@casa.sjsu.edu

TO SUBMIT: The postmark deadline is Thursday, April 1, 2010. Notification will be emailed to all applicants by May 17.

Mail your projects to: Michael Cheers, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0055

2010 Creative Projects Competition

Creative Projects Call For Entries

If you’re an educator involved in creative work that isn’t traditional research, consider the VisCom Division’s “Creative Projects” competition. It’s an excellent opportunity to have your efforts recognized by peers in a juried forum. You would present the work at the national AEJMC convention in Denver Aug. 4-7, 2010.

What gets submitted and accepted? The format is non-restrictive, but an entry must include a strong visual component. Accepted projects in the past have included historical studies, photojournalism exhibits of original work, book proposals or published work, explanations of summer grants or activities, creative DVDs, commentaries on teaching effectiveness, and examples of innovative student projects and accomplishments. Your submission should include a one-to-two page explanation of the work, stressing its significance to the study of visual journalism. Did you receive outside support? Does the project examine cutting-edge technology that will enhance your teaching abilities? How does this project fit in with your own interests and goals as a visual educator? Normally there are about 15 submissions and five are selected for 15-minute presentations.
Internet access is not guaranteed, therefore you must show your work via a CD, laptop, thumb drive, etc. A computer projector will be provided on-site. To submit your project, package four copies of it into four individual 9”x12” envelopes. Large and unusually shaped packages present handling issues. For example, instead of submitting an elaborate 11”x14” leather-bound portfolio of archival photographs, send 8.5”x11” inkjet or laser prints stapled together. Instead of tubes with large rolled posters announcing your film course’s festival, send 8.5”x11” versions. Also, if submitting CDs, use cross-platform common programs.
In one larger package, send your four envelopes (three copies without any identification) to the creative projects chair (see box for mailing instructions). On the cover sheet of the fourth copy, include your name, title, complete contact information
(email, phone numbers) and a 75-word abstract summarizing the project.
Michael Cheers, the contest coordinator, will retain this copy. Submitted material will not be returned.
Please note: You cannot enter creative projects in any other convention category,
including “Best of the Web”
Michael Cheers is the Creative Projects chair and an assistant professor in the School of
Journalism and Mass Communications at San Jose State University. mcheers@casa.sjsu.edu
TO SUBMIT: The postmark deadline is Thursday, April 1, 2010. Notification will be emailed
to all applicants by May 17.
Mail your projects to: Michael Cheers, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, One
Washington Square, San Jose, CA, 95192-0055

Teaching Resources

Sample Syllabus

If you want to share your course syllabus with other members of Visual Communication Division, send your syllabus to nams@uwplatt.edu. As of now, this page is open to public, but it will be member-only area eventually.

JOU3490: Magazine Design

taught by Renee Martin-Kratzer @ University of Florida

CT3430: Advertising Design

taught by Sang Um Nam @ University of Wisconsin – Platteville

CT3100: Topics in Communication – Reactive Image

taught by Sang Um Nam @ University of Wisconsin – Platteville

J344: Photojournalism Reporting

taught by James D. Kelly @ Indiana University, Bloomington

2011 Winning Projects

Creative Projects

1. The Soldiers of the Coal Fields
Joel Beeson, West Virginia
2. To Preserve a Misissippi Visual Legacy:
The Possum Town Project
Berkley Hudson, University of Missouri
3. OkState Flashmob
Cynthia Nichols, Oklahoma State
4. First In – A Student Blog for Journalism and the Law
Francesca Viola, Temple

Best of the Web
Team Innovation
1. Syracuse Diners – Syracuse University
Submitted by Seth Gitner
2. Powering a Nation – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Submitted by Luca Semprini
3. Living Stories – Northwestern University
Submitted by Jeremy Gilbert

Individual Journalism
1. The Unseen O.C. – Tara Graham
USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism

Team Journalism
1. My Story My Goal – University of Miami
Submitted by Rich Beckman
2. World Journalism Project – Syracuse University
Submitted by Steve Masiclat
3. CampusCrime.net – University of Illinois
Submitted by Eric Meyer
4. Chesapeake: Bay on the Brink – University of Maryland
Submitted by Leslie Walker

Resources

Resources for Independent Photographers

List of bookmarks from Sid Hastings as part of his presentation
at the 2011 AEJMC convention panel “We Do the Rest.”
(Note: Creative Mornings link on p. 5 contains language.)

Visual Communication – Visual Rhetorics

Annotated webliography of visual communication and visual rhetoric sites maintained by the University of Iowa Department of Communication Studies.

Sept. 11, 2001 – Visual Collections

Annotated webliography of various visual records of Sept. 11 attack and aftermath maintained by the University of Iowa Department of Communication Studies.

Remembering Nagasaki

Presentation hosted by The Exploratorium: The Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception.

Center for Documentary Studies

An interdisciplinary educational organization affiliated with Duke University.

PixelPress

Site for documentarians and artists to present work.

Pictures of the Year International

Site for annual competition.

College Photographer of the Year

Site for annual competition.

Missouri Photo Workshop

Site for annual workshop.

ZoneZero

Photographic site featuring portfolios, articles and resources covering analog and digital photography.

Two Tours of Magnolia Plantation

Part of New York Times series How Race is Lived in America.

Third View

A rephotographic survey of the American West.

Prof. Andrew Devigal’s Interactive Narratives

A good compendium of visual narrative excellence, and a great way to track innovative approaches to storytelling.

aka Kurdistan

Cultural exchange site related to Kurdish people.

American Photography: A Century of Images

Companion site to the PBS film.

Masters of Photography

Presents work of well-known photographers.

Film Education

Supports elementary and secondary teachers and students using film in the United Kingdom.

Interactive Cinema

Research focusing on formal structures, construction methods, and social impact of highly distributed motion video stories.

Color, Contrast & Dimension in News Design

Online guide that explains color theory and explains how to use it in news design through examples and exercises. Presented by The Poynter Insitute.

The Digital Journalist

Multimedia magazine for photojournalism in the digital age.

The Digital Filmmaker

Resource site for visual storytellers.

Visual Communication

Journal published by SAGE Publications. Contains subscription and submission information.

Visual Communication Division Listserv

Message archives.

Ideal Streaming Technology

Searching for an Ideal Streaming Technology
http://www.iupui.edu/~nmstream/

Send your resources and links to greenwoodk@missouri.edu

Mentoring

Mentoring Program

At the Visual Communication Division business meeting during the 2007 AEJMC summer conference, the members decided that a mentoring program be established on the division Web site. The primary purpose of the program is for graduate students in the division to easily get help from faculty with similar research interests and for junior faculty members to easily get help from senior faculty in terms of research, teaching, tenure, and serving the profession on the national and international levels. A byproduct of the program is that it will help faculty from different universities to find other faculty who share research and teaching interests so that faculty can form research/teaching partnerships.

How the Mentoring Program Works

Any current Visual Communication Division members can use the Mentoring Program database to locate and establish a mentoring relationship. A member can go to the Mentor Listings to pick a professor who the member feels can offer the best one-on-one instruction and tutelage and contact the professor to start a mentoring relationship.

A mentor can be any faculty member who is a Visual Communication Division member and who is willing to devote his/her time to mentor a graduate student or a junior faculty member from another university. A mentor does not have to be a senior faculty. A mentor should be someone interested in furthering his/her own personal development through the education of others. A senior faculty member is defined as a tenured or un-tenured senior lecturer, associate professor, full professor, or equivalent. A junior faculty member is defined as a teaching assistant, lecturer, assistant professor or equivalent. If you are interested in sharing your knowledge, please fill out the database information form to become a mentor.

Although non-members can view the Mentor listing, only members can access the full information under each name.

Here are some guidelines for participating in the Mentoring Program:
1. A mentorship is established on a voluntary basis and availability basis.
2. Mentoring associates may change mentors at any time or may have more than one mentor. Mentors may accept as many associates as they feel they have time for.
3. Either participating party can end a mentorship at any time.
4. The mentoring associate should expect an honest assessment of his/her work, including both positive and negative feedback.
5. The mentoring associate and mentor may contact each other by phone, e-mail, or letter in regards to specific professional questions or advice.
6. A mentorship is not geographically limited. A mentor can be chosen from any area of the globe.

What not to expect from the mentoring program:
The mentoring program is not an avenue for employment possibilities.

Welcome to Visual Communication Division Online

NEW!

Read the Winter 2012 edition of Viewpoints

Call for papers for the 2012 AEJMC convention.

It’s time to submit paper abstracts and panel proposals
for the 2012 Midwinter Conference.
Deadline is Dec. 2. Details are here.

The 2012 Midwinter Conference will include
pre-conference workshop on Flash interactivity.
Register early. Space is limited.

St. Louis convention panel takes a look at 3D.

Find us on Facebook!
Join the AEJMC Visual Communication Division group,
and pass the word to friends with an interest in visual communication.

The winning logo for the 2012
convention in Chicago has been chosen.

 

2011-2012 Visual Communication Division officers.

Berkley Hudson of the Missouri School of Journalism
has been selected as the incoming editor
of Visual Communication Quarterly.

Check out the 2011 winners for
Creative Projects and Best of the Web.

The Visual Communication Division of AEJMC is devoted to the study of visual communication and issues concerning the professional practice of visual media production for presentation. The division members represent a broad spectrum of methodology and application of all types of visual media – advertising, broadcast, digital imaging, film, graphic design, multimedia, web design, photojournalism, propaganda images, visual images and culture, visual literacy, and visual aspects of political campaigns, etc.

AEJMC Promo

Want to know more about the Visual Communication Division? Click the image above to download the Viscom Division brochure.

2008 Logo Design Contest

AEJMC 2008 Convention Logo Design Competition

Design a logo for the Chicago, IL convention, August 2008.

The logo must include the letters AEJMC and the words: August 2008, Chicago. AEJMC should be an integral part of the logo.

Logo designs should:

• Be adaptable to multiple use, i.e., program book cover, name tags and promotional material, including presentation on non-paper material.
• Reflect the diversity of interests within AEJMC. Logo objects, forms and images should be generic to mass communication.
• Retain a sense of balance and internal integrity when typographic elements are removed.
• Be reproducible in black and white and not lose impact or legibility when substantially reduced.
• Not use copyrighted artwork.
Entries must be the work of students enrolled in classes taught by AEJMC members. Students may submit multiple entries, but entries are limited to 10 per school. Student entries are to be submitted the faculty sponsor only. Students should not send their work directly to the logo chair (Nicole Smith). Designs should be submitted on a letter-sized format no smaller than 4″ x 4″ (24 x 24 picas). Include on the same sheet the logo reduced to no larger than 1″x 1.”
DO NOT MOUNT THE ENTRIES.
On each hard copy entry, please include the student’s name, address, school and faculty sponsor on the back of the design.

Mail Entries to:
AEJMC Logo Design Competition
Nicole E. Smith
School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Campus Box #3365
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3365
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: MAY 15, 2007

2007 Creative Projects Competition

AEJMC Visual Communication Division
2007 Creative Projects Competition Call for Entries
Washington, D.C.

If you’re an educator involved in creative work that doesn’t fit the traditional research mold, consider the VisCom Division’s “Creative Projects” competition. It’s an excellent opportunity to have your efforts recognized by peers in a juried forum. You would present the work to AEJMC colleagues at the national convention in Washington, D.C. during the 3:30 – 5 p.m. session on Saturday, Aug. 11, 2007.

What gets submitted and accepted? The format is non-restrictive, but needs to include a visual component to share at the presentation. Accepted projects in the past have included web projects, historical studies, photojournalism exhibits of original work, book proposals or published work, explanations of summer grants or activities, creative DVDs, commentaries on teaching effectiveness and examples of innovative student projects and accomplishments.

Your project should include a one-to-two page explanation of the work, stressing its significance to the study of visual journalism. Did you receive outside support to pursue this project? Does the work examine cutting-edge technology that will enhance your teaching abilities? How does this project fit in with your own interests and goals as a visual educator?

Normally there are 15 submissions and five of the projects will be selected for 15-minute presentations. Internet access is not guaranteed, therefore you must show your work via a CD, laptop, thumb drive, etc. A computer projects will be on-site. To submit your project, package it so that four copies of it will fit into four individual 9”x12”envelopes. After the submissions are received, they are all repackaged and shipped off to three judges. Large and unusually shaped packages have presented problems in the past. Therefore, instead of elaborate 11”x14” leather-bound portfolios of archival photographs, send 8.5”x11” inkjet or laser prints stapled together. Instead of rolled tubes with large posters announcing your film course’s festival, send an 8.5”x11” version. Also, if submitting CDs, try to use crossplatform common programs.

Send your submission (three copies without identification) to the address below. On the cover sheet of the one copy with identification, include your name, complete contact information (include email) and a 75-word abstract summarizing the project. This copy will be retained by the contest coordinator. Submitted material will not be returned.

The postmark deadline is Monday, April 2. Notifications will be emailed to all applicants
about May 15. Good luck!

Creative Projects Chair: Assoc. Prof. John Freeman, College of Journalism and Communications,

University of Florida, 3070 Weimer Hall, P.O. Box 118400, Gainesville, FL 32611.
Email: jfreeman@jou.ufl.edu_Phone: (352) 392-0430